Schedule

Join us July 18-19 in beautiful Salem, MA at the Hawthorne Hotel where skilled craftsmen and industry experts will present engrossing lectures on this year's conference theme, Materials and Methods.

After the Revolutionary War, Salem's unique geography and enterprising citizens established the city as one of the most prosperous sea ports in the Americas. Salem’s pepper and cod fish trades created the wealth to build grand classical buildings. For admirers of traditional architecture, The Salem Athenaeum, Hamilton Hall, The House of Seven Gables and many other significant colonial landmarks constitute our living laboratory. The Traditional Building Conference in Salem features expert-led architecture walking tours which will augment our seminars. Attendees learn best practices for historic restoration and renovation in the field and in the classroom.

palladio awards

PLUS - The Salem conference is proud to host the 2017 Palladio Awards where we will honor exceptional design and present the winning projects of the commercial, institutional, and residential categories. 

 

  

  

Salem 2017 Schedule* and Speakers:

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

8:00 - 9:00 am Breakfast, Registration and Networking

9:00 - 9:15 am Welcome and Introductions

9:15 - 12:45 pm TBC261 Traditional Wooden Windows: Repair, Replace, Detail, and Weatherize

Moderators: W. Lewis “Bill” Barlow, IV, FAIA, and National Park Service (retired) historical architect, Marblehead, MA and Gary Tondorf-Dick, AIA, LEED-AP; Program Manager, Department of Facilities, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA

Panelists: Alison Hardy, President, Window Woman of New England, Amesbury, MA; David Martin, President, Allied Window, Cincinnati, OH; John Sandor, Architectural Historian, US National Park Service, Washington, DC; and Kyle Sword, Manager Business Development, Pilkington North America, Toledo OH

3 AIA Health/ Safety /Welfare Learning Units

When it comes to historic and traditional wooden windows, details are everything. This session brings together a team of leading practitioners in the United States for a facilitated lecture and discussion about the best practices of repairing and replacing historic windows. Expect a thorough discussion of what takes place in the modern window repair shop, insights into historic glass and modern insulated glass; getting the details right when replacing windows; considerations for getting a good fit with storm windows and the role of substitute materials in traditional projects. There will be a discussion on applying the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation for historic window projects.

Learning Objectives:

Explain modern shop practices and procedures used to repair historic wooden windows.

Compare and contrast the differences between vacuum insulated glazing (VIG) and other insulated glass technologies.

Consider the advantages storm windows offer to the protection of historic and new windows.

Balance often competing goals of retaining historic material and achieving a good match when choosing the approach for installing needed replacements; select replacement windows designed for that approach. Distinguish the way materials affect dimensions and profiles of typical manufactured replacement windows.

12:45 -1:45 pm Lunch

1:45 pm - 2:45 pm Traditional Building and Contemporary Structural Repair: The House of the Seven Gables

Speaker: David Hart, AIA, Salem, MA and John Wathne, PE, Structures North, Salem, MA

1 AIA Health/Safety/Welfare Learning Unit

The House of the Seven Gables epitomizes the First Period in American Architectural History (1620-1720). It was built by sea captain and merchant John Turner in 1668. Occupied by three generations of Turners, the house was passed on to the Ingersoll family. Among the Ingersoll’s many relatives was Nathaniel Hawthorne who would pen a novel based on the house in 1851. In the 20 century the house took on a greater significance, serving as settlement housing for the growing number of immigrants arriving in Salem. Today, the house’s preservation continues to be a top priority of the nonprofit museum that is now its steward. The building underwent a recent rehabilitation that included substantial structural alterations.

Learning Objectives:

Consider how changes in the structure affects historic integrity and contributes to its architectural character.

Apply lessons learned from making structural changes in an iconic historic building including engineering analysis, jobsite challenges, and communication process to prepare stakeholders for change.

Explain the process of integrating structural steel into a 17 century timber frame building.

Compare and contrast structural reinforcement with traditional methods and contemporary methods.

2:45 - 3:00 pm Networking Break

3:00 - 5:30 pm Salem Massachusetts and the First Period (1620-1720): Lecture and Tour

Speakers: Scott Stevens, CEO, and Stephen Mallory, Architectural Conservator, Groundroot Preservation Group, Cape Neddick, ME

Note: Extensive walking; wear comfortable shoes.

2 AIA Health/Safety/Welfare Learning Units

Salem has the largest concentration of First Period buildings in North America. Buildings from this era reflect an important connection to Medieval English building practices such as fine joinery and framing, diamond pane glass, wrought iron, and multifunction rooms. Structures now in their fourth century demand fastidious preservation and maintenance. We will join professionals from the Peabody Essex Museum Curatorial and Facilities Management staff for a tour of two of the nation’s outstanding First Period buildings: The John Ward House (1683/1724) and The Pickman House (1664). Recent historic structures reports will be shared with participants.

Learning Objectives:

Examine building materials and craft details up close to evaluate condition, maintenance, causes of deterioration, and qualities of durability.

Compare and contrast period building craft detail with 20 century restoration detail.

Apply lessons learned from maintenance and preservation strategies for some of America’s oldest surviving buildings to the practice of historic preservation on other structures.

Discuss recent developments in historic structure report preparation and analysis that informs the practice of investigating historic buildings before repairs and alterations commence.

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

8:00 - 9:00 am Breakfast, Registration, Networking

9:00 - 9:15 am Welcome and Introductions

9:15 - 12:45 pm Historic Preservation, Sustainability, and Energy Conservation: Collision and Compatibility

Moderators: W. Lewis “Bill” Barlow, IV, FAIA, and National Park Service (retired) historical architect, Marblehead, MA and Gary Tondorf-Dick, AIA, LEED-AP; Program Manager, Department of Facilities, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA

3 AIA Health/Safety/Welfare Learning Units

Panelists: Jason Forney, AIA, Bruner Cott, Cambridge MA; others TBA

Preservation is not a fad and neither is sustainability. But is one more important than the other? The quest for durability is pushing many builders, architects and owners to use substitute materials instead of wood, stone, and plaster. Is it traditional if it is built with synthetic materials in the classical vocabulary of design? Is it traditional if it is built with traditional materials but in a contemporary vocabulary or style? If materials fail in a short period of time, less than 10 years, for example, they would not meet anyone’s definition of durability. How do we avoid that? For many owners, commitment to maintenance is waning. Join a panel of practitioners for a frank discussion about the critical choices we make when working on historic buildings or when building new structures in traditional ways.

Learning Objectives:

Compare and contrast traditional and substitute materials in terms of durability, compatibility, and energy consumption.

Apply the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation to decision-making about energy conservation and materials selection when working on historic buildings.

Make stronger cases based on questions that should be asked when balancing historic preservation, sustainability, energy conservation and traditional building practice.

Explain to stakeholders why considering these values will result in better efficiencies and improved understanding of historic buildings and contemporary application of traditional building craft practice.

12:45 - 1:45 pm Lunch

1:45 - 2:45 pm Traditional Lime Mortar: In-Kind or “Like for Like,” A Conservation Approach to Masonry Restoration

Speaker: Fabio Bardini, Florentine Renaissance Masonry, Salem, MA

1 AIA Health/Safety/Welfare Learning Unit

Do you know the difference between lime putty, hydrated lime and hydraulic lime? How much do you know about Portland and other cements? Do you have an historic building or traditional new building project using brick or stone? Join an experienced mason for a discussion about the importance of matching mortars in-kind or “like for like” on historic preservation projects. This session will illustrate the value of using traditional lime mortars that have stood the test of time as well as present solutions to problems that arise when mortar is too hard for adjacent masonry.

Learning Objectives:

Explain the differences between lime mortars and cements.

Recognize and recommend treatments for failures associated with incorrect mortars that have been used on historic buildings.

Refer to ASTM standards for lime mortars when specifying historic or traditional projects.

Evaluate materials on repointing jobs when checking on-going work for historic preservation projects.

2:45 - 3:00 pm Networking Break

3:00 - 5:30 pm Samuel McIntire (1757-1811) Tour

Tour Leaders: James McAlister, Historian, Salem MA; Richard Jones, Board Member, Hamilton Hall and others TBA

Note: Extensive walking; wear comfortable shoes.

2 AIA Health/Safety/Welfare Learning Units

Master builder, architect, furniture maker and sculptor - the artistic and architectural legacy of Samuel McIntire is best understood by examining the largest concentration of his work and that is found in his hometown, Salem, Massachusetts, in the McIntire National Register Historic District. The tour will include an exploration of the district (407 buildings) with interior visits to Hamilton Hall and one other building.

Learning Objectives:

Examine building materials and craft details up close to evaluate condition, maintenance, causes of deterioration, and qualities of durability.

Compare and contrast period building craft detail with later repairs and replacement craft detail.

Consider urban planning strategies of the 18 and 19 centuries and their continuing relevance to historic urban environments today including fences, streets, setbacks, and parks.

Discuss the craftsmanship and architectural standards of one of America’s greatest master builders, Samuel McIntire.

*Subject to change

2017 Dates:
July 18-19, 2017: Salem, MA
December 5-6, 2017: New York, NY*

*Tentative dates

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The Traditional Building Conference Series is a registered provider of AIA continuing education credits. Credits for NARI, AIBD, and some NAHB certifications are available.