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Full Education Schedule, Alexandria 2022

TBEC-ALEXANDRIA-2022-TEMPEST-option2

Wednesday, April 6, 2022

8:00-9:00: Continental Breakfast and Networking Opportunity

9:00-9:15: Welcome and Introductions

9:15-12:00: The Wisdom of Traditional Window Design (includes a 30 minute networking break)

Moderator: Ashley Wilson, FAIA

Panelists: David Martin, Allied Window; Tim McFadden, Cold Mountain Custom Window and Door Distributors, LLC; Jim Nelson, Mon-Ray, Inc.; Russ Oliveri Architectural Windows and Doors; Michael Shields, Blackberry Systems; Kyle Sword, Pilkington North America, NSG; Chad Thorell, Historical Arts and Casting.

2.25 AIA Health/Safety/Welfare Learning Units.

Traditional building windows: double hung, triple hung, casement, fixed, wood, and metal give us a variety of challenges in our historic and/or new traditional work. When traditional windows are supplemented with storm windows, energy performance is enhanced. New glass technology has made insulating glass possible for new and historic sash. When maintained, historic windows offer authenticity and durability. If original windows have not been maintained, new traditional windows can replicate/ replace existing . This panel will address repair, replication, and installation of windows and storm windows. Important details which support function, durability, energy savings and reduction of the carbon footprint will be discussed.

Learning Objectives:

  • Consider restoration and rehabilitation of historic windows.
  • Explain important details to integrate when replicating traditional windows.
  • Discuss energy savings and sound transmission benefits of storm windows.
  • Evaluate options for glass when working with old and new traditional windows.

12:00- 12:55: Lunch

12:55-2:00: Preserving the Integrity of the American Front Porch

Speaker: Thomas C. Tidwell (Chris), Vice President Sales and Marketing, Aeratis Porch Products

1 AIA Health/Safety/Welfare Learning Unit.

Gain an understanding of why traditional building materials seem to be failing more rapidly when used in creating exterior living space. Explore how to overcome the challenges of specifying, constructing and maintaining porches, balconies and exterior living space. Develop an understanding of how to create iconic, sustainable exterior living space to meet the demands for single family, multi-family, commercial and government projects.

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss design and planning around the limitations of current material options, and the flexibility high-performance materials provide, for the traditional tongue and groove porch floor.
  • Identify how to add finishing touches to increase curb appeal and reduce/eliminate long-term maintenance.
  • Compare and contrast the challenges of traditional materials, and the benefits of utilizing high-performance synthetics in traditional porch applications.
  • Describe the steps for framing, and installation options for different types of applications.

2:05 - 2:15: Stretch break

2:15-3:15: Reconstructing Truss No. 6 from Notre Dame Cathedral- A Model of Collaborative Architectural Education

Speaker: Tonya Ohnstad, AIA, NCARB; Associate Dean of Graduate Studies and Assistant Professor of Practice at the School of Architecture and Planning, The Catholic University of America; Washington, DC

1 AIA Health/Safety/Welfare Learning Unit

Handshouse Studio conceived an idea to respond to the destruction at Notre Dame with a collaborative effort to build a truss, based on documentation from Notre Dame Cathedral, using medieval timber framing practices with architecture students from The Catholic University of America in Washington, DC and members of the Timber Framer’s Guild. Professor Ohnstad taught a six-week course in which students studied the architectural history of Notre Dame Cathedral and learned timber framing skills by creating models. Students also created an exhibition at Catholic University of America and placed student work alongside the completed truss at the National Building Museum. Charpentiers sans Frontières (Carpenters without Borders) supported the effort by securing official plans from the Notre Dame Preservation Projects for the students to use. The frame was erected for one-day on the National Mall with help from the National Park Service Historic Preservation Training Center. This session will explore this model of collaborative and immersive model of architectural education, medieval timber framing, and the importance of incorporating education in every building project.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe Medieval timber framing practices used in both the original construction and reconstruction of Truss Number 6.
  • Evaluate a collaborative educational model that places architecture students with timber framers and historic preservation professionals to work together to create a project and interpret it to a wider audience.
  • Explore the process of preparing the students for safe construction and installation of a full-scale truss in multiple locations.
  • Consider ways to include education and install interpretative exhibits in contemporary projects.

3:15: Gather for Walking Tours/Networking Break

3:30 - 5:30/6:00: Walking Tours

Choose 1 of 3 options

Architectural Highlights of Historic Downtown Alexandria

Tour Guides: TBA – will be drawn from experienced historic preservation professionals from the community

2 AIA Learning Units

Alexandria was established in 1749. It is an early example of a town with streets laid out in a grid pattern. As an important port town, many fine buildings were constructed throughout the 18th and 19th centuries. Today, the historic district covers 100 blocks and retains the largest concentration of urban structures in Virginia and the district is considered the finest assemblage of historic streetscapes in the nation. Art deco buildings and bungalows of the 20th century added to the rich architectural heritage of an earlier time. There is a former Ford plant designed by Albert Kahn and the highly respected adaptive reuse of the Torpedo Factory into artists’ studios. A team of architectural historians drawn from Alexandria and nearby communities will take small groups on an exploration of some of the historic buildings that have been preserved or adaptively reused.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the architectural significance of Alexandria, Virginia’s historic district.
  • Reflect on changes that have occurred over time in the district, such as changes in architectural styles and modifications in streetscapes.
  • Apply lessons learned from adaptive reuse of buildings in the historic district.
  • Explain the work of the Alexandria, Virginia planning department to protect and reuse this impressive collection of buildings and streetscapes for the emotional and economic well-being of residents and visitors to the community today.

Note: Extensive walking; all or part of interior spaces visited are wheel-chair accessible. Please wear sturdy shoes.

OR

Wood, Windows and Masonry: Preservation at Woodlawn and Pope-Leighey Houses

Tour Leaders: Ashley Wilson, FAIA, and Hank Handler, Oak Grove Restoration.

*Limited to 24 participants — advance registration required

2 AIA Health/Safety/Welfare Learning Units

Woodlawn and Pope-Leighey offer contrasting insights into the rich architectural heritage of American design. Woodlawn was built in 1805 with designs from Dr. William Thornton, and Pope-Leighey was designed by Frank Lloyd Wright and completed in 1940. The windows at Woodlawn recently underwent a significant restoration, the cypress cladding of Wright’s Usonian Pope-Leighey House was studied and treated, and the dairy on the premises will undergo significant masonry repairs in the near future. Our tour will focus on these preservation efforts and what they have to teach us about managing historic preservation projects today. The site features an agricultural partnership that continues the site’s farming heritage. While initially staffed by enslaved men, women and children, the property was acquired by Quakers before the Civil War who worked with former enslaved workers to transition them into property ownership. Pope-Leighey was moved to the site to prevent its demolition due to highway expansion.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explain the restoration of the historic windows.
  • Discuss the study and conservation treatment of the cypress cladding and how it informs work on mid-20th century historic structures.
  • Apply lessons learned from the masonry analysis of the dairy to other historic preservation projects.
  • Explain the architectural, working and enslavement histories of this historic site.

OR

Contemporary Preservation in Historic Alexandria.

Tour leaders: T. David Bell, FAIA, LEEDAP; and John Matteo, PE

1.5 AIA Health/Safety/Welfare Learning Units

Join an architect and engineer with practices in Alexandria for their insights on historic preservation, adaptive reuse and infill in historic downtown Alexandria. The walking tour (exteriors only) includes an award-winning historic rehabilitation museum project, and other buildings adapted for reuse as office, retail, and other uses within the historic district. Key aspects of the tour are focused on energy and water efficiency, retention of historic fabric, and other sustainable design factors. Examples of compatible contemporary and interpretive interventions, consistent with the Secretary of Interiors Standards will be seen and discussed.

Learning Objectives:

  • Consider project planning, logistics and safety in walkable, historic commercial areas.
  • Apply lessons learned from building rehabilitation, reuse and infill construction in historic settings.
  • Discuss code compliance, accessibility, and building loads for building reuse in historic districts.
  • Gain perspective on amenities that building users want from commercial rehabilitation or infill projects in historic downtowns.
  • Cite ways to mitigate approval uncertainties in historic districts.

Contact Judy Hayward for specific tour questions at jhayward@aimmedia.com.


Thursday, April 7

8:00-9:00: Continental Breakfast, Networking with Sponsors

9:00 - 9:15: Welcome and Introductions

9:15 am: Masonry Cleaning Methods at the US Capitol

Speaker: Mary Oehrlein, FAIA, Retired Historic Preservation Officer, Architect of the Capitol, Washington, DC

1.25 AIA Health/Safety/Welfare Learning Units

The US Capitol Complex includes some of America’s most important buildings and landscapes. The building exteriors are a veritable repository of the nation’s geological heritage, including marble from Georgia, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, and Vermont; granite from across the country; regional sandstone and Indiana Limestone. The variety of stone types and physical condition demands the use of a variety of cleaning materials and methodologies. This session will review recent cleaning campaigns using water, chemical, laser, micro-abrasion, and poultice.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the range of materials and methods available for cleaning stone.
  • Test and specify to prevent damage to historic stone when cleaning.
  • Plan for the safety and protection of workers, the public and site during cleaning operations.
  • Consider the impact of cleaning on the historic/existing buildings and the environment.

10:30 -10:55 am Networking Break

10:55-12:00: TBC343 Traditional and Transparent: The Stabilization of Menokin House

Speaker: Naomi Doddington, Assistant Project Manager, Consigli Construction

1 AIA Health/Safety/Welfare Learning Unit

Menokin is the home of Francis Lightfoot Lee, a signer of the Declaration of Independence. The house is a ruin but retains nearly 80 percent of its historic fabric. The Menokin Foundation has chosen to stabilize the ruin and infill the missing sections of the building with glass in an effort to showcase the building while not recreating missing elements. When completed, the building will be safe for explorers to study and enjoy the building. The $7 Million rehabilitation project is supported by a rare surviving drawing of the structure dating from 1769 and an extensive collection of 1940 photographs from the Historic American Buildings Survey.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explain the History of Menokin including its construction, ownership, physical changes, documentation, deterioration and recent efforts to save it.
  • Identify the design approach combining archaeology, stabilization, and contemporary infill to emphasize authenticity and create an intriguing interpretive environment.
  • Discuss the project’s masonry preservation- salvage, layout based on historic documentation, stabilization and reconstruction.

12:00-12:55: Lunch

12:55 PM- 2:00 PM: Using the Historic Practice of Practical Geometry Today

Speaker: Jane Griswold Radocchia, Architect and Architectural Historian, Bennington, Vermont

1 AIA Learning Unit

Bring your sketch book and pencil—compass and straight edge optional—for drawing exercises and a lecture on the topic of practical geometry. This session will include a brief history of Practical Geometry as practiced by Vitruvius, Serlio and Palladio and later used by master builders Peter Nicholson, Asher Benjamin, and Owen Biddle in their pattern books. The instructor will cover the “rule of thirds,” the daisy wheel, five ways to draw a square with a compass, straight edge, and pencil. She will make the case about how building professionals can still use Practical Geometry today in their work.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explain how we built before dimensions became standardized in the mid-19th century.
  • Cite historical pattern books and their commentaries on practical geometry.
  • Draw a square with a compass, a straight edge, and a pencil.
  • Apply the use of a Module and Line to construction.

2:00 - 2:05: Stretch break

2:05-3:10: Stone Façade Restoration: Challenges and Best Practices

Speaker: Constance Lai, FAIA, NCARB, LEED AP BD+C; Manager, Historic Preservation Services, Grunley Construction, Rockville, MD

1 AIA Health/Safety Welfare Learning Unit

The restoration of a stone façade, whether it is a marble monument or a limestone-clad office building, is not a straightforward scope that easily fits into the typical design and construction process. Simply put, it is not a discipline or process that is “set in stone.” Not only are restoration techniques constantly evolving, which is challenging to describe in architectural specifications, but the assessment and documentation of potential repairs is not fully possible until temporary access like scaffolding is erected, and that presents more challenges during construction for the budget and schedule. This presentation will provide an overview of basic cleaning and restoration techniques; how these techniques have evolved over the past decade due to new technologies and scientific research; and potential solutions to better integrate façade restoration scopes into the design and construction process.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explain the basic cleaning and restoration techniques for stone structures.
  • Summarize how the restoration of a stone façade can be better integrated into the design and construction process.
  • Describe new technologies and new scientific research in stone preservation and how these new developments have influenced the discipline.
  • List recent developments in the evolution of means and methods of stone restoration techniques.

3:15: Gather for Walking Tours/Networking Break

3:30 - 5:30: Walking Tours

Choose 1 of 2 options

TBC347 Architectural Highlights of Historic Downtown Alexandria

Tour Guides: TBA - will be drawn from experienced historic preservation professionals from the community

2 AIA Learning Units

Alexandria was established in 1749. It is an early example of a town with streets laid out in a grid pattern. As an important port town, many fine buildings were constructed throughout the 18th and 19th centuries. Today, the historic district covers 100 blocks and retains the largest concentration of urban structures in Virginia and the district is considered the finest assemblage of historic streetscapes in the nation. Art deco buildings and bungalows of the 20th century added to the rich architectural heritage of an earlier time. There is a former Ford plant designed by Albert Kahn and the highly respected adaptive reuse of the Torpedo Factory into artists studios. A team of architectural historians drawn from Alexandria and nearby communities will take small groups on an exploration of some of the historic buildings that have been preserved or adaptively reused.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the architectural significance of Alexandria, Virginia’s historic district.
  • Reflect on changes that have occurred over time in the district, such as changes in architectural styles and modifications in streetscapes.
  • Apply lessons learned from adaptive reuse of buildings in the historic district.
  • Explain the work of the Alexandria, Virginia planning department to protect and reuse this impressive collection of buildings and streetscapes for the emotional and economic well-being of residents and visitors to the community today.

Note: Extensive walking; all or part of interior spaces visited are wheel-chair accessible. Please wear sturdy shoes.

OR

An Architectural Tour of the George Washington Masonic National Memorial

Tour Leader: Shawn Eyer, Education and Special Projects, The George Washington Masonic National Memorial Association, Alexandria, VA

2 AIA Learning Units

The Memorial’s form was inspired by the lighthouse of Alexandria, Egypt, one of the ancient Seven Wonders of the World, and its design reflects the classical architecture of Greece and Rome. These styles connect the Memorial to the architecture of Washington’s day, when the classical aesthetic was used to express the democratic principles guiding the new republic. The Memorial’s entrance, inspired by the Parthenon, is of the Doric order. The interior of Memorial Hall is of a modernized Composite order. The three sections of the tower ascend in levels of complexity, with Doric features at the bottom, Ionic in the middle, and Corinthian at the top. The Tower is capped with a pyramid and surmounted by a stylized finial that symbolizes Light. The Memorial is designed to be a beacon that spreads the Light of Freemasonry and the legacy of Washington to all humanity.

The landscaping of the Memorial grounds was done by the renowned Olmsted Brothers firm. Founded by Frederick Law Olmsted—who designed the grounds of the United States Capitol in Washington, D.C., New York City’s Central Park, the Biltmore Estate in North Carolina, and the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago—the Olmsted Brothers remained influential for more than a century. The grounds of the Memorial were specifically designed by an Olmsted employee named Carl Rust Parker, one of the most renowned American landscape architects and a member of the Masonic order.

The tour will include access to an exhibition entitled, the Golden Age of Masonic Architecture.

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss the classical heritage of the design for the Memorial structure.
  • Explain the landscape architecture of the site designed by Olmsted Brothers and their employee Carl Rust Parker.
  • Appreciate the contribution of Masonic neoclassicism to cities around the world.
  • Reflect on the relationship between the Memorial and the Neoclassicism found throughout Washington, DC and its environs.

Contact Judy Hayward for specific tour questions at jhayward@aimmedia.com.